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Tag Archives: bad food additives

Chemical additives in pet foods effect health

The pet food market in Australia, in 2003, was worth over $1.2 billion. Of the 7.5 million households in Australia, 63% own pets so that equates to big business for manufacturers. In recent years, pet foods have been marketed to us in increasingly ‘human’ ways. They promote vitamins and minerals, fibre and other health promoting properties that we would regard as valuable for our beloved pets. Read More…

Sulphites a trigger for eczema

A sensitivity to sulphites can be a major trigger of eczema, asthma and a host of respiratory-type illnesses. This allergy to preservatives is more common than we think. Whether ingested through food or medicines or applied to skin in a personal care product, sulphites can be an ingredient of ‘concern’ for adults and children alike. Read More…

Citric acid (330) an often used food additive

The food additive Citric Acid (330) seems to be on just about every label I check. It is naturally derived from citrus fruits and imparts a sour or citrus flavor to food and beverages. It can also have a preservative effect. Most soft drink labels include citric acid, and you will also find it in icecream where it modifies fat cells, effervescent drinks and wine. Read More…

In food labelling, ‘no added’ doesn’t mean none at all

How reassured are you to see the phrase ‘no added sugar’ or ‘no added artificial colours’ on the packaging of a food item in your supermarket? Have you every bought a ‘no added’ product thinking that item was a healthy alternative? At some time, we have all fallen victim to this sneaky advertising ploy. Read More…

Reading food labels 101

Reading food labels can be a satisfying experience! Every now and again, I come across an item that has no questionable additives or chemicals in it and I give a quiet hip hooray.

Food manufacturers are changing their approach to food technology as we, as consumers, raise our voices about what we can and can’t accept. Read More…

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